Contemporary music, lit, and culture from an SF bay area saxophonist.

 

only evil people prank call their boyfriends.

imaginarydances:

Katzenjammer for chamber ensemble.

Sleazy cats and empty schnapps bottles.

Zachary Sheets, flute
Vicente Alexim, clarinet
Maria Hadge, cello,
Andy Miller, percussion,
Miki Sawada, piano.

Recorded in Lorimer Chapel, Colby College, August 1st, 2014 at the Atlantic Music Festival.

Ned Rorem: Picnic on the Marne - A Tense Discussion

Anthony Prickett, alto saxophone, Victoria Lington, Piano

magictransistor:

Laurent Grasso, Studies Into the Past (Oil, animal adhesives, resin, assorted pigments on oak panel), ca. 2009.

Things i do to remind myself i am beautiful

  • Play my saxophone
  • Listen to Lady Gaga
  • Talk to my boyfriend
  • Put on some pants
historicaltimes:

Soldier buying a ticket to the Leningrad premiere of Shostakovich’s Seventh Symphony, 1942
AntonRubinstein:



The Leningrad première of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7 occurred on 9 August 1942 during the Second World War, while the city of Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) was under siege by Nazi German forces.
Dmitri Shostakovich had intended for the piece to be premièred by the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra, but because of the siege that group was evacuated from the city, as was the composer himself. The world première of the symphony was held in Kuibyshev with the Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra. The Leningrad première was performed by the surviving musicians of the Leningrad Radio Orchestra, supplemented with military performers. Most of the musicians were starving, which made rehearsing difficult: musicians frequently collapsed during rehearsals, and three died. The orchestra was able to play the symphony all the way through only once before the concert.
Despite the poor condition of the performers and many of the audience members, the concert was highly successful, prompting an hour-long ovation. The concert was supported by a Soviet military offensive, code-named Squall, intended to silence German forces during the performance. The symphony was broadcast to the German lines by loudspeaker as a form of psychological warfare. The Leningrad première was considered by music critics to be one of the most important artistic performances of the war because of its psychological and political effects. The conductor concluded that “in that moment, we triumphed over the soulless Nazi war machine”. Reunion concerts featuring surviving musicians were convened in 1964 and 1992 to commemorate the event.

Leningrad première of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7

historicaltimes:

Soldier buying a ticket to the Leningrad premiere of Shostakovich’s Seventh Symphony, 1942

AntonRubinstein:

The Leningrad première of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7 occurred on 9 August 1942 during the Second World War, while the city of Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) was under siege by Nazi German forces.

Dmitri Shostakovich had intended for the piece to be premièred by the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra, but because of the siege that group was evacuated from the city, as was the composer himself. The world première of the symphony was held in Kuibyshev with the Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra. The Leningrad première was performed by the surviving musicians of the Leningrad Radio Orchestra, supplemented with military performers. Most of the musicians were starving, which made rehearsing difficult: musicians frequently collapsed during rehearsals, and three died. The orchestra was able to play the symphony all the way through only once before the concert.

Despite the poor condition of the performers and many of the audience members, the concert was highly successful, prompting an hour-long ovation. The concert was supported by a Soviet military offensive, code-named Squall, intended to silence German forces during the performance. The symphony was broadcast to the German lines by loudspeaker as a form of psychological warfare. The Leningrad première was considered by music critics to be one of the most important artistic performances of the war because of its psychological and political effects. The conductor concluded that “in that moment, we triumphed over the soulless Nazi war machine”. Reunion concerts featuring surviving musicians were convened in 1964 and 1992 to commemorate the event.

Leningrad première of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7

"Beautiful"

All things are beautiful, mother
All trees, all towers, beautiful
That tower, beautiful, mother
See? A perfect tree.

—Stephen Sondheim

That awkward moment when you drink a bunch of tea to get yourself pumped before a lengthy studio class, only to discover it was cancelled—and you have no other plans for the night.